Origami artist, designer to publish third book

Print Article

  • Shuki Kato, a master origami artist who has written several books on the art form, is pictured Nov. 3. (Brenda Ahearn/Daily Inter Lake)

  • 1

    A photo of a bison created by origami artist Shuki Kato. Kato said one of the things he has been challenging himself with is creating eyes for his pieces. (Brenda Ahearn/Daily Inter Lake)

  • 2

    The underside of a dragonfly by Shuki Kato shows the intricacy of the folds used to create it. (Brenda Ahearn/Daily Inter Lake)

  • 3

    Detail of one of the books by origami artist Shuki Kato. (Brenda Ahearn/Daily Inter Lake)

  • 4

    A collection of origami pieces created by artist Shuki Kato. (Brenda Ahearn/Daily Inter Lake)

  • Shuki Kato, a master origami artist who has written several books on the art form, is pictured Nov. 3. (Brenda Ahearn/Daily Inter Lake)

  • 1

    A photo of a bison created by origami artist Shuki Kato. Kato said one of the things he has been challenging himself with is creating eyes for his pieces. (Brenda Ahearn/Daily Inter Lake)

  • 2

    The underside of a dragonfly by Shuki Kato shows the intricacy of the folds used to create it. (Brenda Ahearn/Daily Inter Lake)

  • 3

    Detail of one of the books by origami artist Shuki Kato. (Brenda Ahearn/Daily Inter Lake)

  • 4

    A collection of origami pieces created by artist Shuki Kato. (Brenda Ahearn/Daily Inter Lake)

A piece of paper can become anything Shuki Kato wants it to be. It’s all in knowing how to fold it.

Kato, 27, is well-known in the world of origami, the ancient art of folding paper that derives its name from the Japanese words “oru” (to fold) and “kami” (paper). He discovered origami when he was about 6, and has been folding paper continuously since he received his first origami book, “Origami Sea Life” when he was 9, the year his family relocated from Bellingham, Washington, to Kalispell.

“I started designing my own models early, but the majority of them came about by just doodling — folding a sheet of paper without any actual specific outcome in mind,” Kato said.

He kept at it, perfecting his designs, mostly of animals and insects. In origami there are no cuts to the paper, no glue, only folds. In 2004 he got his hands on a copy of origami master Robert Lang’s book, “Origami Design Secrets,” and dove headlong into designing.

“It was fundamental in my own quest of becoming a better origami designer,” he said about the book.

He was also inspired by Lang, one of the foremost origami artists and theorists in the world.

“He’s my idol,” Kato said, noting Lang’s study of the mathematics of origami. “He does lots of math formulas. I do a lot of trial and error.”

Kato kept collecting books about the art and has amassed a collection of more than 30 origami books.

“Most books are diagrams,” he said.

“Being a designer is very cool. You learn designing over the years,” he said. “You stick with your style, but you still want to learn.”

Origami can involve dozens or even hundreds of steps for a single piece of art. Kato’s giraffe design, for example, has 209 separate steps.

Over time he began using Flickr, an image- and video-hosting website, and DeviantArt, an online artwork website, to post photos of his designs. And origami aficionados began to take note of Kato’s extraordinary ability. The online platform enabled Kato to get feedback about his designs and observe what other origami artists were doing.

When Kato posted his completed beetle design on the Origami USA website, it caught the attention of Lang, who then opened the door to Kato’s first book-publishing opportunity. Lang recommended Kato’s designs for a 2013 book titled “Origami Masters Bugs,” which features origami models from seven different origami artists, including two of Kato’s models. That got him noticed in a big way in origami circles and he was invited to origami conventions in Tokyo, Japan, and Seoul, South Korea, that same year. That was a big foot in the door for more exposure and networking.

Kato’s second book, “Origami City,” was a collaboration with Jordan Langerak that featured a variety of famous buildings such as the Eiffel Tower, the White House and the Louvre in Paris.

“The Sydney Opera House was my favorite,” he said.

The book showed origami depictions of some famous buildings, but not the design patterns for all of them, in an effort to be an aspirational tool for origami artists. But without the designs, some people “felt ripped off,” Kato said. He reviewed his own book on Amazon to explain the rationale for publishing photos without design patterns.

Kato’s third book, “Origami Nature Study,” is available for pre-order, with a release date in early December. It includes a compilation of his best designs over the past several years.

“For people who have known my work online, they’ve been asking for a book,” he said. “It was easily the most difficult book [I have completed.] There are lengthy sequences.”

There are only a handful of origami artists in the world who make a living at their craft. Kato would like to be one of those few.

Beyond folding and selling his diagrams, Kato’s other job is working as an assistant at the Buffalo Hill Golf Club Pro Shop. He enjoys golf and he’s a pretty good golfer, his peers confide.

Kato’s family — he has three sisters who also have artistic ability — discovered the Kalispell area when they stopped through on their way back to Washington from a vacation in the Northwest Territory. They loved the Flathead, and Kato’s father, who immigrated from Japan to America when he was in his late 20s, then got a job at Applied Materials.

Some time after Kato completed his high-school education via home-schooling he worked at Applied Materials for eight months doing electrical work — “they teach on the job and I was good at following diagrams,” he noted. But he quit to finish his associate degree at Flathead Valley Community College, work on his origami designs and publish books of his designs. Those who admire his work would say that was a very good career move.

Print Article

Read More

Officials ID couple killed in Nov. 21 crash

November 24, 2017 at 12:42 pm | Daily Inter Lake The Flathead County Sheriff’s Office has released the names of the victims of a fatal single-vehicle crash on U.S. 2 just west of McGregor Lake Lodge on Nov. 21. They have been identified as Justi...

Comments

Read More

Troy woman killed in Thanksgiving crash

November 24, 2017 at 11:21 am | Daily Inter Lake A 26-year-old Troy woman was killed in a two-vehicle crash on Montana 35 Thanksgiving night. The woman was driving a 1993 Nissan Altima southbound on the highway near Broeder Loop Road at 7:06 p.m...

Comments

Read More

Hundreds turn out for Whitefish event

November 24, 2017 at 6:00 am | Daily Inter Lake The drizzle eased, the temperature topped 50 and a piece of rainbow gleamed behind the North Valley Food Bank as participants gathered for the eighth annual Whitefish Turkey Trot. In four years r...

Comments

Read More

Shop at local small businesses

November 24, 2017 at 6:00 am | Daily Inter Lake Saturday is the day to “shop small” in the Flathead Valley and support the backbone of our local business community. We’re glad to see the momentum Small Business Saturday has gained since it starte...

Comments

Read More

Contact Us

News: (406) 837-5131
Advertising: 406-758-4410
Bigfork Eagle
c/o Daily Inter Lake
PO Box 7610
Kalispell, MT 59904

©2017 Bigfork Eagle Terms of Use Privacy Policy
X
X